The Tale of an ALS Survivor Episode 25

My hand was weak. That was the only sign of anything wrong, until we went to Mexico on vacation.

While I was walking with Mona, I fell onto the sidewalk. Then, after the fall, I had to crawl in order to climb up stairs.

Whatever was wrong, it was suddenly getting scary!

I went to my local M.D., a knowledgeable physician, but he didn’t know what was happening to me.

My case demonstrates how ALS can creep up slowly before you — and your doctor — have any idea that you have it.

On average, it takes up to 18 months to get an ALS diagnosis.

EverythingALS.org/Research is working hard to change that.

Here’s how you can help: We launched a Speech Project early this year and now have 500 participants to help us find early biomarkers of ALS. This will give people with ALS time to slow down some of the physical symptoms with treatments and gain the support of our community as well as financial support.

We need 500 more participants by August 30. Our study can be done at home and only requires 10 minutes of your time a week to collect speech and visual (facial) data from your computing device.

Whether you have ALS or want to be part of our ALS-free control group, your participation in our IRB-approved Speech Project will help everyone — patients, caretakers, family, and physicians — with an early diagnosis.

I spent a lot of time searching the web to find a reason for my decline. You don’t have to. Join our Speech Project and help take the mystery out of ALS diagnosis.

Join us at everythingals.org/research.

P.S. Anyone who signs up 10 or more participants is eligible to be selected as EverythingALS Champion of the Month and will be interviewed on our podcast, Stories and Innovations in ALS, and featured on our social media.

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McFinn Lovere

McFinn Lovere

Both arms and both legs paralyzed. 2 fingers left to control the wheelchair. Dr Bedlacks 42nd ALS reversal at Duke University ALS Clinic.